NEWS RELEASE

Patty Garcia-Likens, SRP Media Relations, (602) 236-2500
@SRPpatty
January 21, 2014


SRP to Fund Planting of 4,100 Trees to Celebrate Cardinals' 41 TDs

To be Planted in Areas Destroyed by Forest Fires

The season may be over for the Arizona Cardinals, but thanks to their 41 touchdowns this season thousands of trees in northern Arizona will be planted.

Media resources


Additional resources related to the Trees for Change program are available on SRP's website and in the digital media resource center:

Salt River Project pledged to fund the planting of 100 ponderosa pine trees for every Cardinals' touchdown scored during the 2013 regular season. SRP will plant a total of 4,100 trees through its Trees for Change program.

The Trees for Change program allows customers to donate an additional $3 or more to their monthly bill to fund the planting of trees in Arizona forests that have been destroyed by fire. During their lifetime, the 4,100 trees will remove carbon dioxide from the air, store carbon in plant tissues and produce oxygen.

"SRP is proud of what our customers have done to help reforest Arizona lands destroyed by these devastating fires," said Lori Singleton, director of Emerging Customer Programs for Solar, Sustainability and Telecom at SRP. "Hundreds of thousands of ponderosa pine seedlings have been planted through this program, and we thank the Cardinals' efforts on the field for helping us plant even more."

The trees will be planted in northern Arizona with the assistance of the National Forest Foundation in areas destroyed by wildfires.

"There is still a lot to be done to bring these forests back to their original beauty," Singleton said.

SRP customers can help to revitalize the forests by signing up for the Trees for Change program. Customers can pledge an additional $3 or more to their monthly bill, and SRP will match each dollar up to $160,000 annually, with 100 percent of the funds used to plant trees.

So far, nearly 2,000 customers have joined the program. For more information, call (602) 236-4448 or visit www.srpnet.com/trees.