69kV line projects boost reliability

SRP, a major provider of electricity to the Valley, is proposing to build new 69,000 volt (69kV) subtransmission lines to meet the area's growing demand for power and provide better electric reliability to the community.

You can view our overview map to see the locations of all current and proposed 69kV projects. You can also view a diagram showing how SRP electricity gets to your home.

Proposed projects

There are currently no projects in the proposal stage.

Projects in the design phase

These 69kV projects have moved through the public process phase and are now in design:

  1. Mesa/Apache Junction: Browning-Scussel line
    A new power line will connect Browning substation at Signal Butte, south of Guadalupe Road, to the planned Scussel substation near Lost Dutchman Heights. Find out more about this project.
  2. Pinal County: Quail-Meacham-Watkins line
    A new power line will connect the future Watkins and Meacham substations to the existing electrical system in northeastern Pinal County. Find out more about this project.
  3. Pinal County: Quail-Shipley line
    A new power line will connect the Quail substation at Quail Run Lane and Bella Vista Road to the future Shipley substation at Cooper Road and Judd Road. Find out more about this project.

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Projects under construction


This 69kV project is currently in the construction phase.

  1. Queen Creek: Morcom
    A new power line will connect the future Morcom substation on Ellsworth (just south of Riggs Road) to the existing 69kV line on Empire Road. Find out more.

Construction details

An image of a 69kV pole.

Typically, new 69kV lines are built on a mix of steel and wood poles approximately 65 feet tall. The span between poles would be 220 feet to 400 feet, depending upon the location of any existing power lines. In some cases, rebuilding an existing 69kV line to double circuit can eliminate the need for a new pole line.

SRP does not, as usual practice, place 69kV lines underground. Standard construction for 69kV lines is overhead due to the time and expense of burying lines of this voltage. In addition, there are often underground conflicts that must be considered, including:

  • storm drains
  • irrigation
  • 12kV electric lines
  • telephone
  • cable TV
  • sewer
  • water

69kV lines traverse neighborhoods across the Valley. Putting them underground would be very costly, and the impact on customer electric prices would be significant.

About substations

SRP provides electricity to its customers through an interconnected grid of 69-kilovolt (69kV) power lines and distribution substations. The substations are the hub for serving neighborhood electrical needs. These facilities are found every four square miles, providing electricity to area homes, schools and businesses.

Image of a substation

Overhead power lines carrying 69kV of electricity connect the substations, which transform the power to 12kV. The electricity then travels out of the substation, either overhead on poles or underground, into the surrounding neighborhoods. Small transformers step down the 12kV power to a lower voltage for commercial, industrial or residential use.

View a diagram to see how electricity is delivered.

SRP's standard enclosure is a chain-link fence.

Contact us

Please call SRP at (602) 236-2872 or send us an email for more information or to share your comments.

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